Category Archives: PIANO TUNING MASTER

PIANO TUNING MASTER











HENRY Z STEINWAY PIANO MAKER

HENRY Z STEINWAY PIANO MAKER

I remember on special Steinway events here in the Northern Virginia area the now soon to be raised Jordan Kitt’s Steinway dealer on Gallows Rd between Merrifield and Tyson’s corner would have Henry Steinway available to sign the soundboard of your Steinway after a selection and purchase.

Often I would attend the Jordan Kitt’s Steinway event just because Henry Steinway would be there. Henry in the room was enough for me and although I had the pleasure to meet him once, I really wanted to just be there and observe other piano lovers interacting with Henry Steinway as he entertained any questions they may have had. So now this is a rather fond memory of Henry Steinway at Jordan Kitt’s Music in Vienna Virginia, my home these many years.

My Favorite link that includes mention of Henry Steinway & Franz Mohr, both just recently visited the new Jordan Kitt’s Music showroom, for the kick off, (and signed my Steinway anniversary tuning lever), plus mention of Bill Garlick my tuning instructor and the former Director of the piano technology program at North Bennett Street School In Boston is http://yost.com/art/Steinway

Also recently a wonderful article about Henry Steinway’s 91st Birthday from MMR Music Merchandise Review that introduces the Henry Z. Steinway Limited Edition piano.
The Z piano is being produced in a series of 91 handcrafted instruments, available in two sizes, each signed by Henry Steinway, great-grandson of Steinway founder Henry Engelhard Steinway.

Featuring late 19th century colonial design elements, the piano has a hand-carved music desk adorned with scroll work and its namesake’s initials. Atop each leg is a hand-carved floral medallion, while the legs are carved with straight barrel-fluted pillars that match the lyre pedals and bench.

On the inner rim, each piano bears a brass medallion honoring the four generations of the Steinway family members who led the company: Henry E., William, Theodore, and Henry Z. The medallion also displays the limited-edition series number of the instrument.

The Henry Z. Steinway Limited Edition piano is available as a 5’10” Model O and 6’10” Model B. It is offered in ebony and East Indian rosewood finishes. Prices range from $71,000 to $125,400.

In 1955, Henry Steinway became the last family member to lead the company and did so as president for 22 years.

The New York Times Link is most expansive.

Henry Z. Steinway, the last Steinway to run the piano-making company his family started in 1853, died Thursday at his home in Manhattan. He was 93.

His death was confirmed by a daughter, Susan Steinway.

Mr. Steinway once said that he had taken countless piano lessons but never knew “which is Beethoven’s this or Beethoven’s that.” He remained proficient on a typewriter’s keys, however; long after the world had adopted personal computers, he was still pounding away on his Smith-Corona manual.

Henry Ziegler Steinway — named for an uncle, and not to be confused with a cousin, Henry Steinway Ziegler — was the great-grandson of Heinrich Engelhard Steinway, the illiterate German immigrant before the ampersand in Steinway & Sons. Henry was born on Aug. 23, 1915, in his parents’ apartment on Park Avenue, between East 52nd and 53rd Streets.

The location was important to his tradition-minded father, Theodore E. Steinway. The Steinways’ factory, the largest piano plant in New York City when it opened, had occupied that site from just before the Civil War until about 1910. Theodore rented an apartment in the building that took the factory’s place. (The apartment house was demolished in the 1950s to make way for Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building.)

By the time Henry was a boy, the name Steinway had become almost synonymous with pianos, famous on concert stages as well as in Tin Pan Alley. Irving Berlin paid homage in “I Love a Piano” with the lyric “I know a fine way to treat a Steinway.”

After shuttering its Manhattan factory, Steinway & Sons moved its manufacturing operations to Queens, and as a child Henry wandered through a labyrinth of sawdust-strewn workrooms. He joined the company after graduating from Harvard in 1937 and began his career by building pianos, just as his father and uncles had.

“I learned a respect for work that is actually done,” Mr. Steinway said years later.

He also discovered that making instruments that have thousands of tiny parts under the lid is not easy. He said it took him a day and a half to do what the workers at the factory did in four hours.

In the 1940s, following the death of a cousin who had been the company’s general manager, Mr. Steinway began overseeing operations at the company’s three factories in Queens. Poor eyesight kept him away from the front lines during World War II; the Army stationed him on Governors Island in New York Harbor.

He became the factory manager after the war and president of the company in 1955, when his father made a surprise announcement that he was stepping down, immediately.

By then the piano business was struggling against changing technologies and tastes. Phonographs and radios had displaced pianos as home entertainment choices, and television was on the rise. As Mr. Steinway recalled in 2003: “People would say: ‘You’re in the piano business? That doesn’t exist anymore.’ ”

So he downsized the company — though he preferred the term “right-sized” — closing two of the plants in Queens. He decided that concert artists to whom the company had lent pianos would have to return them, unless they bought them.

He also arranged to sell Steinway Hall, the company’s building on West 57th Street, to Manhattan Life Insurance Company. He moved most of the company’s offices, including his own, to Queens. But the showroom, with its big front window and arched ceilings, remained.

In 1972 he sold the company itself. “It was the hippie time,” he recalled in 2003. “Nobody in the next generation —”

He left the rest of the sentence unsaid. He said he did not believe that any of his younger relatives could take over, so he proposed a $20.1 million stock swap with the CBS Corporation. The deliberations split the family, with his mother, Ruth, calling the sale “a betrayal,” although she ultimately voted for it.

CBS replaced him as president in 1977, naming him chairman. He gave up that title when he retired at 65, but he never really left. Until a few months ago, he went to Steinway Hall most days. He also went to the factory to autograph just-finished pianos, signing the cast-iron plates with felt-tip pens. At times he served as a goodwill ambassador, visiting piano dealers and attending music-industry conventions.

Last year President Bush presented him with the National Medal of Arts, the government’s highest award in the arts. Mr. Steinway was also the founding president of the Museum of Making Music in Carlsbad, Calif.

In addition to his daughter Susan, of Cambridge, Mass., he is survived by his wife, Polly; another daughter, Kate, of West Hartford, Conn.; three sons, William, of Chapel Hill, N.C., Daniel, of Rutland, Vt., and Henry E., of Los Angeles; and seven grandchildren.

CBS sold Steinway in 1985, and the company changed hands again in 1995. Mr. Steinway recalled worrying about that sale, to what was then Selmer Industries, a band-instrument manufacturer that had been taken over by two investment bankers from Los Angeles.

“I thought, ‘Here we go up the flue for sure,’ ” Mr. Steinway said in 2003. “ ‘Two hotshots who’re not yet 40. This is where we get liquidated for sure.’ ”

But the two investment bankers, Dana D. Messina and Kyle R. Kirkland, changed Selmer Industries’ name to Steinway Musical Instruments. Mr. Steinway liked to recall that when they took the company public in 1998, they used Ludwig van Beethoven’s initials for a stock symbol— LVB — because all possible combinations of S’s and T’s were taken.

I know in my heart this is truely the end of an era.

Henry Z Steinway

[youtube width=”500″ height=”418″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_E99AQhBM8[/youtube]

stretch

STRETCH

Stretch

Matching The Verituner ‘Box’ To The Piano

A simple method to pre-test and adjust your Verituner to the piano presented in a short presentation, in Chicago land by Dr Woodwind

Watch this video on YouTube.

If you’re an electronic tuner how do you know that the electronic tuning you have calculated fits the piano in front of you?

Let’s consider for a moment how we tune a unison. Pick any note here in the middle we are going to mute off one string till we are satisfied with it. Pick the next string,we may go over we may go below and we try to find the best place for that unison.

I’m going to apologize for competing with the percussionists today, this is like practice room row!

We’re going to look at tuning octaves the same way we tune a unison, so the idea is you go ahead however your machine asks you to do it calculate the tuner to the best of your ability, taking your samples, we are gonna tune A4 of course. Now we have muted off so we only have one string to clear the string you can set that string as best you can allow that string will let you tune in it on the piano in front of you and then lets go down and see A3 where the machine wants us to set A3 which will be our temperment octave, again tune that as well as you can, and then just play it as you can, and just play it as an octave.

That’s pretty good but let’s see if we can do a little better. I want you to just treat that as a unison we are gonna go a little lower and then a little higher and try to find the pocket.

So we’re not gonna worry about 4/2 octave or 6/3 octave 2/1 octave just how does it sound the best place where it sounds this is about the best I can make it.

So now we are using the Verituner as a bookmark now. You notice that I have my ear has told me, one, two, three cents sharper that what the machine says.

What you need to do is understand your own machine well enough to know how to change the tuning parameters.

Um, these are

stretch parameters

style parameters

OTS parameters

these are different things you can do to alter the tuning on your Verituner you match what the tuning is on your ear. Now on the Verituner I’ve gotta go find a different style that will match, more closely. I have them all numbered so seven is a fairly wide style need to go up closer, um, to find something closer that might work for this piano and once you have pianos under your belt you’ll know before hand you know if I see a Baldwin upright I know what style to pick that will work for it.

And again A4 just double check it, that’s good. Drop down to A3, and there we go we are right on the money. Go ahead and go down to A2, tune it the way the machine says, and drop down the octave and then check it, that’s got a roll to it, don’t really like that either (more tuning) that’s a little better. We need to go a little flatr, we need to find a style that will have a little lower section in that part of the piano, there we go and then just work your way, as far as you feel comfortable as far as you (pause, more tuning)

So basically what we are doing is setting up bookmarks, setting up a road map for the machine to fit the tuning in between, because if you give it endpoints it can calculate in between fairly well. And then it’s up to you to find out how to manipulate your own machine. There are forums on line that can help you, you can ask questions on line of people how to set that.

But, the key concept here is to know you can tune a unison and tune two strings together simply by ear with no checks, you can also do two strings an octave apart by ear, double check with the double octave or triple octave as you work your way up to find the pocket so you can build a good ladder an appropriate ladder for this particular instrument

If you really want to get picky you may check Eb which is half way between the A’s, and also check some of those.

Again it is a trade off between how much time you want to spend before you actually start tuning the piano.

Hopefully this will help you, this approach as you work with it, will help you shorten the tune time so that you don’t have the entire piano tuned and then say well- I need to change this, I need to change that, I need to change that.

It should start you off with a tuning that should at least fit your A’s and that everything in between should be a lot closer than if you just picked an average tuning or the default tuning that comes with the box

(starts tuning again)

end

HANS ZIMMER | PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN

HANS ZIMMER | PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN

Pirates – Orchestra Sound Track

[fve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvVgWEu0TYo&feature=related[/fve]

In a edited interview mixed with studio orchestra Hans Zimmer comments on the sound track to Pirates of the Caribbean.

After a brief video intro Hans says inspiration comes through the sheer terror of trying to get it done ..

(music session with video – smpte – as recording is underway)

I think that this is really Gods vision, and Gods work, and ultimately I’m just happy that he asked me to be on board again, literally, ha ha wink wink on board

(more of the recording session)

This is, this is so much just trying to serve the directors vision and really I believe that’s what it should be about

(more music and film where Jack Sparrow says ‘we are looking for this, the chest of Davy Jones’)

It’s a – it is a fairly good double act by now, Jerry says turn left, I’ll go no no no no , we must turn right, and somehow out of that scramble comes a completely new idea.

(more music recording the ending then laughter and cheers – ‘thank you’ from the conductor)

i wrote what is generally known amongst my troops as the ‘Jack’s Suite’ which is six minutes of mahemn and craziness which is really where we get most of the ideas for this movie from.

(music)

I was thinking of my old friend Keith Richards and stuff like that you know, give it a bit of attitude, give it a bit of, you know, that whole thing.

(music Jack Sparrow says ‘what is it that has Jack spooked? How much do you know about Davy Jones?’)

I don’t really play to much of the comedy

(music and Jack says’ it is a key, it is a drawing of a key gentlemen for what is it that keys do?’)

I play everything for real and I think you know I did it in the first one too. I think that’s part of the secret of keeping the whole idea of this going, you are allowed to get excited, you are allowed to keep a secret, you are allowed to fall in love

I tried to ignore the enormous pressure on us to try to deliver something that is far superior than the first movie, more action, more fun, more romance, more death, more dieing, more pirating, more arrgh!

(movie clip of the octopus man screaming ‘Jack Sparrow’)

then

‘there are common moments when you have the chance to do the right thing’

Jack replies -‘I love those moments I like to waver them as they pass by’

(music – end)

MONSTER’S BALL

MONSTER’S BALL

MONSTER’S BALL [sc_embed_player volume=”50″ preload= “true” autoplay=true loops=”true” fileurl=”http://masterpianotuner.com/audio/End Title.mp3″]

Watch this video on YouTube.

Music For the Film Monster’s Ball

Composers Asche & Spencer discuss the Process…

In a fascinating open discussion alternating comments, the composers as well as the editors make comments on the hand in hand process of composing and editing the soundtrack for the film Monster’s Ball.

Marc Spencer said a lot of people don’t hear the music in films actually, that the score, the underscore, uh, because it should be very subtle, it shouldn’t be in your face. It should be in your subconscious, because once it is in your face, then you realize it and that’s a bad thing because in a sense you shouldn’t realize the camera and you shouldn’t realize the images. You should realized anything that…you just should ..all you should do is be part of the story.

Composer Thad Spencer said when we first read the script for the film and met, we had, varied ideas about what musical styles would work and what we wanted to do, but one theme that ran throughout all the ideas was that it had a very ambient texture, well, in pursuing that broad range of ideas, we decided that the best thing to do would be to limit our instrumentation, to actually use certain instruments and to only those instruments and not expand outside of those instruments, thus giving all the music a very minimal and all important feel.

Composer Richard Werbowenko said the majority of the instruments you hear are processed acoustic instruments (e.g. piano) or guitars, there are a lot of electric guitar textures that are put through different amplifiers, delays, reverbs, modulation effects to kinda create something that really has a long, kinda ‘drifty’ quality without it sounding the same.

Chris Beaty said we really stretched an event for what song we had… as far as we could stretch it and once you get it then, stretched like that, it’s hard to tell what they are.

I think the most complicated aspect of this was creating a style of music that didn’t draw a lot of attention to itself but gave a lot of meaning. ( movie clip shows Thorton saying “bye Pop” moving to get dressed.)

Having multiple composers was a real positive thing for the film. The three of us really bounced ideas off of each other.

If you were in a position where you were, got to a certain point on a piece of music and maybe wondering is this even any good, you could always draw one of the other composers into your room and ask “what do you think? is this horrible ? is this any good?

We all wrote different Ques we all -uh- helped each other perform and -uh- kinda conceptualized different Ques.

If there’s constant dialog between the people writing and uh, uh, true collaboration it works really well.

One of the designs of the music was to carry you through this and give you a sense of a persevering spirit, without necessarily saying every thing’s going to be o k and instead it was more something you could ride on through the whole film and it could help deliver you to a place that was more inside people and less about all the material things and crap that could happen to them.

The first place that you have to start is uh, you know, what is this scene saying, what is this scene really trying to emote, and whats the most subtle way to support what the scene is actually trying to express

Re-recording engineer Rick Asche said what I noticed here more than anything else and I was very happy about was that the music sorta played the over all theme of what the scene or that arc of scenes was doing so that we as a viewer actually got to understand a much bigger and broader picture of what’s going on with these characters.

If I’m totally reaching to music all the time then the music just becomes like emotional finger painting, as opposed to something that can hold water.

Overall I saw the film was very quite for me. I saw a lot of silences a lot breathing room in the film so the music only would come in, uh , in certain places, which would elevate and interrupt those silences in a very beautiful and emotional and magical way.

A lot of the music was written before the images were available to us, based on the script that we read, and, I’m really glad that we went about it that way, in that we weren’t always reaching to what was on the screen all the time, instead, it was the over all emotion that we got from reading the script.

When you don’t have to worry about an edit schedule or a specific timing, so your just allowed to write music very freely based on what you feel emotionally is gonna be happening in different parts of the film and then that music is simply delivered to the editor and director and they can sift through it and find what they like.

So it’s sort of hand in hand process between composer filmmaker and editor

Composer Matt Chesse’ said I started out with a bunch of their music that I, you know, that I laid it throughout the film, then I laid the film on them and let them absorb the mood with their score worked in there, but a lot of places were open for interpretation.

There’s a point at the end of the film where Latesha (Halle Berre’s character) comes into the kitchen and shes just found out that Hank (Billy Bob Thornton’s character) had a hand in executing her husband but we don’t know how upset she is

(All three together) you see the cameras doing this kinda slow pan thing (there we go) here we go , wait because he doesn’t even…starts to.. here we go, here we go… starts to creep in now…

Needed to support this tension, we didn’t want to point anybody…. in any particular direction

as to how they should feel.

All watching together again someone mutters “it’s cool” then plays guitar “maybe something like that?”

The end of the film gives people some resolve and the score definitely does that too. To the point that the end it’s a very simple melody. It’s giving you that little bit of hope, that little bit of resolve.

It’s important for us to come at that moment very artfully.

It was an opportunity for emotions in the film to stretch a little bit and so, it was also an opportunity for the music in the film to stretch a little bit.

The music in the score incorporates so much poetry on it’s own.

And that was,you know, that was our goal all along so you wouldn’t walk out of there singing the Monster’s Ball melody, but that you would, you know, remember the mood you got from it.

Directed by | Jon Baugh

Thanks to

Marc Forester

Matt Chesse’

Joel C. High

Rick Asche

Vine St Studio

Asche & Spencer

Chris Betty

Than Spencer

Richard Werbowenko

Bob Demaa

Chuck Statler

Soundtrack available on | Lions Gate Records

www.monstersballfilm.com

VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

Veritune…a better way…

This is a terrific series presented from Chicago land by Drwoodwind

Part six (six of six) is a video usng the Verituner to tune a piano in the confines of a practice room somewhere in Chicagoland

Drwoodwind starts tuning the treble and says

next time I do one of these (Mason & Hamilton) I want to over pull the treble a little bit more than I did last time

looks like just this first section

Looks like I really missed the overpull up here even more than when I gave it the first pass

thats better…

you have to taper way at the top…

on the first pass

there’s a correlation to jump you know to the next…

looks like I beat an hour…55 minutes or so

(plays chords)

You could always go over it again, some voicing, or check out some of the action problems

buzzing etc

(plays a song)

end of this series

Watch this video on YouTube.
VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

Veritune…a better way…

This is a terrific series presented by Dr Woodwind from Chicago land

Part five (five of six)is a video using the verituner to tune a piano in the confines of a practice room some  where in Chicago land Part five begins tuning the middle section of the piano.

Then Dr Woodwind says

now that we’ve got the middle section

lets go ahead and get the bass strings (begins the bass)

I go ahead and force a ‘recalc’ if I hit something new and I know a lot of people just like to go ahead and do the bass strings.

(some chords at the end of tuning the base)

Then up to the treble

Drwoodwind mutters….

if your still with me

Watch this video on YouTube.
VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

Veritune…a better way…

This is a terrific series presented from Chicago land by Drwoodwind

Part four (four of six) is a video using the Verituner to tune a piano in the confines of a practice room some where in Chicagoland

During more tuning we hear a couple of coughs probably from dust flying off the piano hammers

a rough test playing of the Mason & Hamilton

then Drwoodwind says

well…we’re closer lets go ahead and switch to fine tune, lets see where we ended up

You can actually use the over-pull here if you want to and mark where you missed

Watch this video on YouTube.
VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

Veritune…a better way…

This is a terrific series presented from Chicago land by Drwoodwind

Part two (two of six) is a video using the Verituner to tune a piano in the confines of a practice room somewhere in ‘Chicagoland’.

Drwoodwind said now we’re gonna press and hold …clear all our markers so we’re starting fresh

We’re ten minutes in so far. Sometimes you’ll get better measurements if you move the unit around.

I’m trying to keep it here so you can see it.

And again

because we’ve over-pulled one note already

we only need to…

need less overpulling

If you need to reset zero over-pull

(come over here…) [Drwoodwind talking to the device]

Watch this video on YouTube.

VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

VERITUNE …A BETTER WAY…

VERITUNE …a better way…

This is a terrific series presented from Chicago land by Drwoodwind

Part one (one of six) is a video using the Verituner to tune a piano in the confines of a practice room somewhere in ‘Chicagoland’.

Drwoodwind said it’s January outside of Chicago, it’s a Mason & Hamilton upright, indoor humidity is 21% so naturally it’s pretty flat

Today I’m going to try and pitch raise and fine tune as efficiently as possible using the Verituner. I will display all three over pulls, so it’s roughly 10% in this area, 25% in this area and 35% overpull in this area

The goal is to, after the first pass, be as close to a fine tuning as we can be so there is minimum adjustment left to be done for that final pass

The Verituner needs to get some information, it will update it’s information as we go (in real time)

so…..

it’s about 20 % err- 20 cents flat, I’m working to fill the [ I ] (Inharmonicity) I’m on the medium ‘zoom’ right now and I’m actually going to start these about half way between the first two arrows. I only have the needle displayed A3 A4 is in the ‘bracket’ for the temperment. I’ll go ahead and give it A5 so it knows about what (Inharmonicity) is there

And now it’s a matter of going through the piano giving it the information it needs to fill those [ I’s ]

Notice how I sound the note first to let the VERITUNER start calculating before I even move the hammer

starting at about twelve o’clock over here taking my time in this temperment section to try and fill the [ I ]

This should work for any style even the built in styles or one of my custom styles (one for all)

I’m measuring the right string, when I come back and tune this piano for good, I’ll be working on the left string over-pull

Again

this isn’t so much a ‘tuning’ pass as a ‘measuring’ pass until we reach the bass strings, just while I’m working I might as well get something done.

If you are ‘close’ you can use the ‘ zoom ‘

I’ll go ahead and pull the unisons for these three strings (in the bass section) here

Notice it was a miss measure over-pull but I know that I was just over pulling the previous note less than a cent.

Watch this video on YouTube.

PERFECT PIANO

PERFECT PIANO

PERFECT

A concept of perfection…

expands from the philosophical to….

the legal to…

the grammatical to…

mathematical to…

biological and also to the musical.

In music exists…

the perfect interval-

octave fifth fourth and perfect unison.

Of course the piano tuner is perpetually in pursuit of the perfect tuning

for each and every tuning as a mission and lofty goal

Regardless of definition,

resorting to words like excellent, complete, exact, without flaw, pure, absolute, expert, unmitigated, having all,

the tuner focus is on that endeavor to bring nearer to perfection

improving as fully possible to be unblemished and faultless…

whether it can be said that this condition exists or does not.

But certainly to be ‘most’ perfect and always more perfect as modification can provide

for all purposes,

although there are some that feel words that modify as

more, most, nearly, almost and rather should not be combined with perfect…

since perfect is an absolute,

a yes-no condition that cannot be said to exist in varying degree.

Perhaps then a piano tuner

is with qualification the ‘perfecter’ or the ‘perfectest’

to account for all varieties available or imaginable and ideal for all purposes

PERFECT PIANO

Being complete

without blemish

satisfying all

is then also

the goal of

recording

and sampling

piano

SOUND ON SOUND

Jan 2008 volume 23 issue 3

attempts to describe this perfection in the well covered topic

‘PERFECT PIANO’

Recording a real one? Chosing a sampled one?

As is suggested ‘Read this first’ and travel into the thought process behind that pursuit of

‘Perfect’

as only SOUND ON SOUND could cover

Topics such as what type of mic to use, sample libraries, ambient techniques,

horizontal and vertical dispersion,

spaced stereo and getting an even sound are covered here.

If you need to consider where to set up the piano and mic position

this article is for you to really help narrow down choices in your quest for

the perfect!

MARYLAND MD

MARYLAND MD

[fve]http://www.bsomusic.org/res/test_res/multimedia/marin_pr2.mov[/fve] [fve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a44ik7jZIaw&playnext=1&list=PL36D2D34061714A48&feature=results_video[/fve] [fve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pk00Gf0i3Io&playnext=1&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E&feature=results_main[/fve] [fve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spW7vHI15Yo&feature=autoplay&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E&playnext=2[/fve]

Maryland MD BSO Sets the Stage for Learning

In Baltimore Maryland, beginning in 2007, BSO Music Director Marin Alsop said I’m pleased that the Baltimore Symphony agrees with my philosophy on mentoring and we’re proud to announce a brand a new conducting initiative. We’re collaborating with Peabody Conservatory and the League of American Orchestras in creating a brand new position for a talented young conductor. It’ll be a two year program where the young conductor will conduct the Baltimore Symphony, attend Peabody Conservatory and get real hands on experience. We’ve already selected the first recipient of the award, Joe Young, and so…you’ll see him around the concert hall and you’ll probably even see him on the podium now and then

I want to enable people to feel really connected to composers. That’s one of the reasons I’ve invited so many living composers here, we’re going to speak to them. We have a series called composers in conversation which will be on Wednesday evening and also I want people to feel connected to Beethoven. So I’m really obsessed with these forensic shows, I don’t know if anybody else is. I decided the best way to get to know Beethoven would be to do a forensic autopsy on him and so I’ve invited scientists from Johns Hopkins to join me and we’re going to sort of dissect him, I hate to say that, but dissect Beethoven in front of the audience for two evenings. We’ll have the whole orchestra there, We’re going to play his music, we’re going to analyze what elements lead to his hearing loss, what kind of mental state and just generally what conditions lead to his greatness

Part of my vision is to try to take advantage of all the new technologies we have available to us. Fortunately we’ve already embarked on a brand new recording initiative making records for Naxos and for Sony records. We’re starting a series of pod casts for iTunes and we’re also featured on XM radio

[fve]http://www.bsomusic.org/res/test_res/multimedia/marin_pr1.mov[/fve]

Marin Alsop on conducting

I’ve always wanted to be a conductor, I’ve wanted to be a conductor since I was nine years old, and, my mother and father are both professional musicians. I had to be a musician there was really no choice about that but when my father took me to see Lenard Bernstein conduct the New York Philharmonic when I was I guess nine years old. As soon a I saw him I thought, oh – this is what I want to do, so I never changed my mind from then and I fell in love with him, I fell in love with the idea of conducting. It was a dream I harbored for all those years and it took a while to figure out how to be a conductor actually

And you know as a violin you play one line you know and I mean and it’s really critical but it’s just one line contributing to music that has, you know-one hundred things going on at once and I think for me the idea of being responsible for the architecture, you know-the whole experience the emotional journey the quality of sound the vision the piecing and everything, thats what appealed to me always and I think I was always one of those kids, even if I was bad at a sport was always the captain of the team and I think this idea of galvanizing people and hopefully inspiring them to come together and do their best as a team was something that always appealed to me and thats really what conducting is all about. I think that it’s really important that we feature along side very established well known artists, young talented emerging artists because of course, like with the composers that I’m featuring this year, they were once aspiring composers. Now they’re really the leading composers of the day and the artists that we feature will also be the leading artists of tomorrow and it’s nice I think for our audience and for our musicians to sort of get in on the ground floor as their elevator is rising so to speak

This is definitely the highlight of my career so far having a wonderful time with the musicians of the Baltimore Symphony, we’re going to create something brand new some kind of excitement. We’re trying to bring classical music to everybody, bring it back to where it used to be where it was part of everybody’s lives..it was accessible, it was fun, it was interesting, engaging and we feel that we’re just part of the community, we’re owned by the greater Baltimore community and so we want to be available to everybody so people can access the symphony to what ever degree they want

for more information or how to support the Maryland MD Baltimore Symphony Orchestra please visit

www.bsomusic.org

www.bsokids.com

WASHINGTON DC

WASHINGTON DC

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Washington DC Kennedy Center Sets the Stage for Learning

A video tour for kids

In Washington DC Associate Conductor Emil de Cou on tour said the Kennedy Center is a living memorial to John F Kennedy. When I say Memorial I mean the Kennedy Center is more than just a building. It’s a place for dance, plays, where concerts happen everyday. When people come for a performance they help bring the memorial to life.

I hear you can come see us perform at the concert hall. Let me show you around

This is the Kennedy Center Plaza. It’s filled with art work, reflecting pools and fountains, and on the day you’re going to visit us school buses too!

There’s a whole lot more to see inside …lets go!

The first thing you should know about the Kennedy Center is that it’s a real big place. This is the Hall of Nations. It got its name from all the international flags hanging above my head. See how many you can pick out. Over there is the stage door. That’s where the musicians and I go to work but it’s off limits to most people

That’s the Grand Foyer lets go check it out. What’s a foyer you ask, just a fancy name for a lobby. This is the grand foyer because it’s the entry way to the Kennedy Centers three largest performing halls- the Eisenhower Theater, the Opera House and the Concert Hall. This foyer is so long that the Washington Monument can lie on its side and there would still be room for a herd of cows. But enough about the grand foyer, lets go inside the concert hall, that’s my favorite part.

Oh yeah, when you come here with your school, the teacher will meet an usher and they will show you to your seat. But when you come here with your family the usher will take your ticket and put it right here in this box.

This is the concert hall, it’s an amazing place isn’t it? Over 2400 people can watch a performance from here, that’s like thirty five buses filled with kids and 45 baseball teams plus another sixty families of four. No matter what seat you get on any of the concert halls four levels, you’ll have a great view of the performers on stage. Lets walk down to the stage and I’ll point out some more interesting features

The scene on concert day will be different from what you see now. The musicians of the National Symphony Orchestra will be in those empty chairs on stage and you, along with a couple thousand other people will be part of our audience.

Behind those walls over there is the conductors dressing room and the musicians lounge but that whole area back there is off limits to the public. The stage I’m sitting on is made of wood like those hi-tech panels that are hanging above me and the floor beneath all the seats and the seat backs. The wood through out the concert hall helps the music travel to each seat as the musicians play their instruments, the sound they create bounces off the wood and is sent toward the listener.

Other materials could have been chosen like carpet or metal. Carpet, however, absorbs to much sound and metal makes the sound bounce to much. The natural properties of wood absorb a small amount of sound and send just the right amount toward the listener.

You probably noticed those pipes on the wall behind me. They’re part of a very large organ that is played at some of the concerts here.There are over four thousand pipes, some as small as your pinky, others as large as a telephone pole.

Whelp, that about wraps it up. I’m sorry I couldn’t show you everything but there are rules. On behalf of the National Symphony Orchestra and the Kennedy Center I look forward to seeing you at our concerts

Your not gone yet are you? If we hurry we can take a look at some of the places most people never get to see, so here we are now at the backstage area of the concert hall. Over there is where the musicians hang out and this over here is my dressing room, you can study, play piano or even take a nap.

O k, I think the coast is clear, this way ! Right before the concert begins I stand here ready to walk on stage, the door opens and I join the musicians on stage to thunderous applauses (we like that part) And here I am on the podium in front of thousands of concert goers, I bow to the audience then I turn to the musicians of the National Symphony Orchestra and we all share in the applause. It’s really fun, then I go to work. It’s really fun conducting that is, It’s important for me to show energy and excitement when I’m conducting the orchestra. They’ll know just how to play the music

Well I guess we better stop here and I hope you’ve enjoyed this behind the scenes look at the Kennedy Center and don’t tell anyone we’ve been sneaking around the concert hall. I’ll see you at the concert

for more information or to learn how you can help contact

 

The Education Department of the John F Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Washington DC

 

 

www.kennedy-center.org

VIRGINIA VA

VIRGINIA VA

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Virginia Va Wolf Trap Sets The Stage For Learning

In Vienna Virginia, for over twenty-five years Wolf Trap has helped close the gap that has historically left children of primarily disadvantaged areas behind other children.

Miriam Flahnerty Willis Senior Director of Education, Wolf Trap Foundation said Wolf Trap Institute for early learning through the arts brings professional performing artists who are teaching artists into classrooms to work directly with teachers and our youngest children, children three four and five years old in preschool settings across the country

Each year Wolf Trap teaching artists work with early childhood educators to develop classroom learning experiences that provide their students with critical developmental skills and competencies they need for success in school and in life

Carol Bellamy an education manager for head start says children are different learners, children learn in different ways. Some children are kinesthetic learners, they like to move. Some children are auditory learners so those skills need to be fine tuned.

At a glance what looks like a simple arts activity is in reality a learning experience supporting multiple areas of development for the children

Krissie Marty a teaching artist said we did serialization, we did steady beat counting. The children… their pre-literacy skills included sequencing, recalling, comprehension, sub-phonetic awareness using their vocabulary

Learning through the arts, its a model for early childhood education that has made the Wolf Trap Institute for early learning for the arts, a leader for communities across the nation. More important the research shows it works for children

Douglas Klayman PHD President, Social Dynamics said the result of the research was very positive. We looked at six domains including inititive, social relations, creativity, movement in music, language and literacy and math and science. We found that the children who were part of the Wolf Trap Institute Program did better than the children in the comparison group

Changing teaching! Changing learning and changing lives! I know that no matter what happens within these children, because Wolf Trap is there in their classroom, that they’re forever changed for the better

Daryl Green National Spokes Person, Wolf Trap Foundation says investing in our young children is the best strategy for improving their odds for a brighter future. Your support will make the difference by providing our young children with the skills they need for a lifetime of learning

You can set the stage today for a child tomorrow

 

 

To learn how you can help, please contact

Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts

Vienna Virginia Va U.S.A.

www.wolftrap.org

WORLD

WORLD

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World

All around me are familiar faces Worn out places, worn out faces

 

Bright and early for their daily races Going nowhere, going nowhere

 

Their tears are filling up their glasses No expression, no expression

 

Hide my head I want to drown my sorrow No tomorrow, no tomorrow

And I find it kind of funny

I find it kind of sad

The dreams in which I’m dying

Are the best I’ve ever had

I find it hard to tell you

I find it hard to take

When people run in circles

It’s a very, very

Mad World

Mad World

Children waiting for the day they feel good Happy Birthday, Happy Birthday

 

And I feel the way that every child should Sit and listen, sit and listen

 

Went to school and I was very nervious No one knew me, no one knew me

 

Hello teacher tell me what’s my lesson Look right through me,

look right through me

and I find it kind of funny

I find it kind of sad

The dreams in which I’m dying

Are the best I’ve ever had

I find it hard to tell you

I find it hard to take

When people run in circles

It’s a very, very…

 

 

 

 

Enlarging your world

Mad World