Category Archives: PIANO TUNING

PIANO TUNING











Tuning a piano ‘moulds the mind’

Tuning a piano ‘moulds the mind’

Read the whole article on BBC News:

Science & Nature

Tuning a piano ‘moulds the mind’

Piano

The changes occurred outside of auditory brain areas

Tuning a piano also tunes the brain, say researchers who have seen structural changes within the brains of professional piano tuners.

Researchers at University College London and Newcastle University found listening to two notes played simultaneously makes the brain adapt.

Brain scans revealed highly specific changes in the hippocampus, which governs memory and navigation.

These correlated with the number of years tuners had been doing this job.

The Wellcome Trust researchers used magnetic resonance imaging to compare the brains of 19 professional piano tuners – who play two notes simultaneously to make them pitch-perfect – and 19 other people.

What they saw was highly specific changes in both the grey matter – the nerve cells where information processing takes place – and the white matter – the nerve connections – within the brains of the piano tuners.

Investigator Sundeep Teki said: “We already know that musical training can correlate with structural changes, but our group of professionals offered a rare opportunity to examine the ability of the brain to adapt over time to a very specialised form of listening.”

Other researchers have noted similar hippocampal changes in taxi drivers as they build up detailed information needed to find their way around London’s labyrinth of streets.

Prof Tim Griffiths, who led the latest study, published in Neuroscience, said: “There has been little work on the role of the hippocampus in auditory analysis.

“Our study is consistent with a form of navigation in pitch space as opposed to the more accepted role in spatial navigation.”

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pianoteq-sos20080012

SOFTWARE PIANOS

SOFTWARE

SOFTWARE PIANOS

Not sure about a real piano, the time is right to concider a sampled piano and choices abound! Practically speaking a real piano isn’t always ‘practical’. If you seem to have more computer space than the room for a good sized piano take heart as a guide herein tells all. TruePianos offers up a three piano package for a multi-core or Power PC G5 Mac, simple interface of presets for each module sonic adjustment as well as tuning adjustment. The sound is ‘dry’ with no room acoustics. 40 day demo is available on

Service Galaxy ll an upgrade from Galaxy Steinway,

offers up a Steinway D Bösendorfer Imperial 290

and a Blüthner 150.Multisampled and miked for

surround and stereo is a treat.Strong at jazz classic or pop and smooth up seven octaves

I have previously covered the Blüthner Digital model one earlier

Native Instruments Akoustic Piano provide a Steinway D a Bechstein D 280, a Bösendorfer 290 and a Steigräver 130. 10 velocity levels on each note and tuning available (cool

Pianoteq v2.2 is not sample based but modeled.As modeled hammers resonance sustain stacato and a host of other variables as well as size.Very good considering its nor sampled. 45 day demo

Sampletekk is 24bit multisampled fair in a library format all listed on their website include 7CG Yamaha, Black Grand-Steinway D, PMI Bösendorfer 290, PMI Estonia 9 ft, Pmi Hybrid, Pmi Old Lady 1923 D, Pmi Steinway D Pmi The Emperor Bösendorfer 290, PMI Yamaha C7, SG88 MKll,The Big One Yamaha C7 and White Grand 9 Ft Malmsjö Concert Grand

Steinberg The Grand 2 are a dry mix of two large well known pianos in anechoic chamber (I can still hear Dr Wright on that one) I would like to present this in a future post Synthology Ivory 9ft D Börsendorfer 290 Yamaha C7 all with 10 velocity levels Vienna Symphonic Library Börsendorfer 290 multisampled 7 velocities quite possibly the best in its class

Find a wealth of information

and help

on these

and more

in

SOUND ON SOUND

PERFECT PIANO

PERFECT PIANO

PERFECT

A concept of perfection…

expands from the philosophical to….

the legal to…

the grammatical to…

mathematical to…

biological and also to the musical.

In music exists…

the perfect interval-

octave fifth fourth and perfect unison.

Of course the piano tuner is perpetually in pursuit of the perfect tuning

for each and every tuning as a mission and lofty goal

Regardless of definition,

resorting to words like excellent, complete, exact, without flaw, pure, absolute, expert, unmitigated, having all,

the tuner focus is on that endeavor to bring nearer to perfection

improving as fully possible to be unblemished and faultless…

whether it can be said that this condition exists or does not.

But certainly to be ‘most’ perfect and always more perfect as modification can provide

for all purposes,

although there are some that feel words that modify as

more, most, nearly, almost and rather should not be combined with perfect…

since perfect is an absolute,

a yes-no condition that cannot be said to exist in varying degree.

Perhaps then a piano tuner

is with qualification the ‘perfecter’ or the ‘perfectest’

to account for all varieties available or imaginable and ideal for all purposes

PERFECT PIANO

Being complete

without blemish

satisfying all

is then also

the goal of

recording

and sampling

piano

SOUND ON SOUND

Jan 2008 volume 23 issue 3

attempts to describe this perfection in the well covered topic

‘PERFECT PIANO’

Recording a real one? Chosing a sampled one?

As is suggested ‘Read this first’ and travel into the thought process behind that pursuit of

‘Perfect’

as only SOUND ON SOUND could cover

Topics such as what type of mic to use, sample libraries, ambient techniques,

horizontal and vertical dispersion,

spaced stereo and getting an even sound are covered here.

If you need to consider where to set up the piano and mic position

this article is for you to really help narrow down choices in your quest for

the perfect!

MARYLAND MD

MARYLAND MD

[fve]http://www.bsomusic.org/res/test_res/multimedia/marin_pr2.mov[/fve] [fve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a44ik7jZIaw&playnext=1&list=PL36D2D34061714A48&feature=results_video[/fve] [fve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pk00Gf0i3Io&playnext=1&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E&feature=results_main[/fve] [fve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spW7vHI15Yo&feature=autoplay&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E&playnext=2[/fve]

Maryland MD BSO Sets the Stage for Learning

In Baltimore Maryland, beginning in 2007, BSO Music Director Marin Alsop said I’m pleased that the Baltimore Symphony agrees with my philosophy on mentoring and we’re proud to announce a brand a new conducting initiative. We’re collaborating with Peabody Conservatory and the League of American Orchestras in creating a brand new position for a talented young conductor. It’ll be a two year program where the young conductor will conduct the Baltimore Symphony, attend Peabody Conservatory and get real hands on experience. We’ve already selected the first recipient of the award, Joe Young, and so…you’ll see him around the concert hall and you’ll probably even see him on the podium now and then

I want to enable people to feel really connected to composers. That’s one of the reasons I’ve invited so many living composers here, we’re going to speak to them. We have a series called composers in conversation which will be on Wednesday evening and also I want people to feel connected to Beethoven. So I’m really obsessed with these forensic shows, I don’t know if anybody else is. I decided the best way to get to know Beethoven would be to do a forensic autopsy on him and so I’ve invited scientists from Johns Hopkins to join me and we’re going to sort of dissect him, I hate to say that, but dissect Beethoven in front of the audience for two evenings. We’ll have the whole orchestra there, We’re going to play his music, we’re going to analyze what elements lead to his hearing loss, what kind of mental state and just generally what conditions lead to his greatness

Part of my vision is to try to take advantage of all the new technologies we have available to us. Fortunately we’ve already embarked on a brand new recording initiative making records for Naxos and for Sony records. We’re starting a series of pod casts for iTunes and we’re also featured on XM radio

[fve]http://www.bsomusic.org/res/test_res/multimedia/marin_pr1.mov[/fve]

Marin Alsop on conducting

I’ve always wanted to be a conductor, I’ve wanted to be a conductor since I was nine years old, and, my mother and father are both professional musicians. I had to be a musician there was really no choice about that but when my father took me to see Lenard Bernstein conduct the New York Philharmonic when I was I guess nine years old. As soon a I saw him I thought, oh – this is what I want to do, so I never changed my mind from then and I fell in love with him, I fell in love with the idea of conducting. It was a dream I harbored for all those years and it took a while to figure out how to be a conductor actually

And you know as a violin you play one line you know and I mean and it’s really critical but it’s just one line contributing to music that has, you know-one hundred things going on at once and I think for me the idea of being responsible for the architecture, you know-the whole experience the emotional journey the quality of sound the vision the piecing and everything, thats what appealed to me always and I think I was always one of those kids, even if I was bad at a sport was always the captain of the team and I think this idea of galvanizing people and hopefully inspiring them to come together and do their best as a team was something that always appealed to me and thats really what conducting is all about. I think that it’s really important that we feature along side very established well known artists, young talented emerging artists because of course, like with the composers that I’m featuring this year, they were once aspiring composers. Now they’re really the leading composers of the day and the artists that we feature will also be the leading artists of tomorrow and it’s nice I think for our audience and for our musicians to sort of get in on the ground floor as their elevator is rising so to speak

This is definitely the highlight of my career so far having a wonderful time with the musicians of the Baltimore Symphony, we’re going to create something brand new some kind of excitement. We’re trying to bring classical music to everybody, bring it back to where it used to be where it was part of everybody’s lives..it was accessible, it was fun, it was interesting, engaging and we feel that we’re just part of the community, we’re owned by the greater Baltimore community and so we want to be available to everybody so people can access the symphony to what ever degree they want

for more information or how to support the Maryland MD Baltimore Symphony Orchestra please visit

www.bsomusic.org

www.bsokids.com

WASHINGTON DC

WASHINGTON DC

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Washington DC Kennedy Center Sets the Stage for Learning

A video tour for kids

In Washington DC Associate Conductor Emil de Cou on tour said the Kennedy Center is a living memorial to John F Kennedy. When I say Memorial I mean the Kennedy Center is more than just a building. It’s a place for dance, plays, where concerts happen everyday. When people come for a performance they help bring the memorial to life.

I hear you can come see us perform at the concert hall. Let me show you around

This is the Kennedy Center Plaza. It’s filled with art work, reflecting pools and fountains, and on the day you’re going to visit us school buses too!

There’s a whole lot more to see inside …lets go!

The first thing you should know about the Kennedy Center is that it’s a real big place. This is the Hall of Nations. It got its name from all the international flags hanging above my head. See how many you can pick out. Over there is the stage door. That’s where the musicians and I go to work but it’s off limits to most people

That’s the Grand Foyer lets go check it out. What’s a foyer you ask, just a fancy name for a lobby. This is the grand foyer because it’s the entry way to the Kennedy Centers three largest performing halls- the Eisenhower Theater, the Opera House and the Concert Hall. This foyer is so long that the Washington Monument can lie on its side and there would still be room for a herd of cows. But enough about the grand foyer, lets go inside the concert hall, that’s my favorite part.

Oh yeah, when you come here with your school, the teacher will meet an usher and they will show you to your seat. But when you come here with your family the usher will take your ticket and put it right here in this box.

This is the concert hall, it’s an amazing place isn’t it? Over 2400 people can watch a performance from here, that’s like thirty five buses filled with kids and 45 baseball teams plus another sixty families of four. No matter what seat you get on any of the concert halls four levels, you’ll have a great view of the performers on stage. Lets walk down to the stage and I’ll point out some more interesting features

The scene on concert day will be different from what you see now. The musicians of the National Symphony Orchestra will be in those empty chairs on stage and you, along with a couple thousand other people will be part of our audience.

Behind those walls over there is the conductors dressing room and the musicians lounge but that whole area back there is off limits to the public. The stage I’m sitting on is made of wood like those hi-tech panels that are hanging above me and the floor beneath all the seats and the seat backs. The wood through out the concert hall helps the music travel to each seat as the musicians play their instruments, the sound they create bounces off the wood and is sent toward the listener.

Other materials could have been chosen like carpet or metal. Carpet, however, absorbs to much sound and metal makes the sound bounce to much. The natural properties of wood absorb a small amount of sound and send just the right amount toward the listener.

You probably noticed those pipes on the wall behind me. They’re part of a very large organ that is played at some of the concerts here.There are over four thousand pipes, some as small as your pinky, others as large as a telephone pole.

Whelp, that about wraps it up. I’m sorry I couldn’t show you everything but there are rules. On behalf of the National Symphony Orchestra and the Kennedy Center I look forward to seeing you at our concerts

Your not gone yet are you? If we hurry we can take a look at some of the places most people never get to see, so here we are now at the backstage area of the concert hall. Over there is where the musicians hang out and this over here is my dressing room, you can study, play piano or even take a nap.

O k, I think the coast is clear, this way ! Right before the concert begins I stand here ready to walk on stage, the door opens and I join the musicians on stage to thunderous applauses (we like that part) And here I am on the podium in front of thousands of concert goers, I bow to the audience then I turn to the musicians of the National Symphony Orchestra and we all share in the applause. It’s really fun, then I go to work. It’s really fun conducting that is, It’s important for me to show energy and excitement when I’m conducting the orchestra. They’ll know just how to play the music

Well I guess we better stop here and I hope you’ve enjoyed this behind the scenes look at the Kennedy Center and don’t tell anyone we’ve been sneaking around the concert hall. I’ll see you at the concert

for more information or to learn how you can help contact

 

The Education Department of the John F Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Washington DC

 

 

www.kennedy-center.org

WORLD

WORLD

[fve]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpjKPy64NpM[/fve]

World

All around me are familiar faces Worn out places, worn out faces

 

Bright and early for their daily races Going nowhere, going nowhere

 

Their tears are filling up their glasses No expression, no expression

 

Hide my head I want to drown my sorrow No tomorrow, no tomorrow

And I find it kind of funny

I find it kind of sad

The dreams in which I’m dying

Are the best I’ve ever had

I find it hard to tell you

I find it hard to take

When people run in circles

It’s a very, very

Mad World

Mad World

Children waiting for the day they feel good Happy Birthday, Happy Birthday

 

And I feel the way that every child should Sit and listen, sit and listen

 

Went to school and I was very nervious No one knew me, no one knew me

 

Hello teacher tell me what’s my lesson Look right through me,

look right through me

and I find it kind of funny

I find it kind of sad

The dreams in which I’m dying

Are the best I’ve ever had

I find it hard to tell you

I find it hard to take

When people run in circles

It’s a very, very…

 

 

 

 

Enlarging your world

Mad World